Capetian France 987-1328

Capetian France 987-1328

Hallam, Elizabeth M.; West, Charles

Taylor & Francis Ltd

07/2019

492

Mole

Inglês

9781138887688

15 a 20 dias

Descrição não disponível.
CHAPTER ONE French Society in the Tenth and Eleventh Centuries 1.1 INTRODUCTION 1.1.1 The origins of West Francia 1.2 THE FRENCH ECONOMY AND SOCIETY 1.2.1 A stagnant economy? 1.2.2 Nobles and knights 1.2.3 Lords and peasants 1.3 THE STRUCTURE OF POWER 1.3.1 Principalities, counties and castellanies 1.3.2 The bonds of society: vassalage and the fief 1.3.3 Church and society 1.4 POLITICAL DEVELOPMENTS OF THE TENTH CENTURY 1.4.1 987: the beginning of a new era? CHAPTER TWO Politics and Society: A Regional View 2.1 INTRODUCTION 2.1.1 Local societies in the French kingdom 2.1.2 The princes in eleventh- and twelfth-century France 2.2 THE PRINCIPALITIES: NORTH 2.2.1 The duchy of Burgundy 2.2.2 The lands of Blois-Champagne. 2.2.3 Flanders and Picardy 2.2.4 The duchy of Normandy 2.2.5 The duchy of Brittany 2.2.6 Greater Anjou 2.3 THE PRINCIPALITIES: SOUTH 2.3.1 Southern Society 2.3.2 The duchy of Aquitaine 2.3.3 Gascony, Toulouse and Barcelona CHAPTER THREE The Early Capetians, 987-1108 3.1 INTRODUCTION 3.1.1 The early Capetians: mere territorial princes? 3.2 THE KINGS AND THEIR REIGNS 3.2.1 Hugh Capet, 987-996 3.2.2 Robert II the Pious', 996-1031 3.2.3 Henry I, 1031-60 3.2.4 Philip I, 1060-1108 3.3 THE FOUNDATIONS OF ROYAL POWER 3.3.1 The royal domain 3.3.2. The ecclesiastical domain 3.3.3 The royal principality 3.3.4 Royal government and the royal entourage 3.3.5 The king and the princes 3.3.6 Royal defence 3.4 THE KINGS AND THE CHURCH 3.4.1 Kings, bishops and Cluniacs, 987-1049 3.4.2 Monarchy and papal reform, 1049-1108 Chapter 4 THE REVIVAL OF ROYAL POWER, 1108-1226 4.1. INTRODUCTION 4.1.1 The Capetian revival: an inevitable development? 4.2 THE KINGS AND THEIR REIGNS 4.2.1 Louis VI, 1108-37: the king and the castellans 4.2.2 Louis VI, 1108-37: the king in the kingdom 4.2.3 Louis VII, 1137-80: politics of grandeur and illusion, 1137-51 4.2.4 Louis VII, 1137-80: Eleanor of Aquitaine and the Plantagenets, 1151-80 4.2.5 Philip II Augustus,' 1180-1223: campaigning and crusading, 1180-1200 4.2.6 Philip II Augustus,' 1180-1223: conquests and triumphs, 1200-1214 4.2.7 Philip II Augustus,' 1180-1223: after Bouvines, 1214-23 4.2.8 Louis VIII, 1223-6 4.3 FRENCH SOCIETY, 1108-1226 4.3.1 Social and economic changes 4.3.2 The growth of Paris 4.3.3 Orthodox and heretical religious movements 4.3.4 Learning, literature and the schools in France 4.4 THE GROWTH IN ROYAL POWER, 1108-1226 4.4.1 The status of the French monarchy 4.4.2 The image of monarchy 4.4.3 Queens and queenship 4.4.4 The royal household 4.4.5 Communal privileges and royal defence 4.4.6 The royal principality and the domain to c.1200 4.4.7 The principalities to c. 1200: Blois, Champagne, Burgundy, Flanders, Toulouse 4.4.8 The principalities of the west and south: was there an Angevin empire'? 4.4.9 Royal resources: Capetians versus Plantagenets 4.4.10 Capetian rule in Normandy 4.4.11 The Capetians, the Languedoc and the Albigensian Crusade 4.5 THE KINGS AND THE CHURCH 4.5.1 Louis VI, Louis VII and the church 4.5.2 Philip Augustus, Louis VIII and the church Chapter 5 LOUIS IX: THE CONSOLIDATION OF ROYAL POWER, 1226-70 5.1 INTRODUCTION 5.1.1 Louis IX: holy kingship and political power 5.2 THE REIGN OF LOUIS IX 5.2.1 Louis's minority, 1226-34: the guardianship of Blanche of Castile 5.2.2 Louis IX the young king, 1234-44 5.2.3 Louis IX, the crusader king, 1244-54 5.2.4 France without the king, 1248-54 5.2.5 Holy kingship, 1254-67 5.2.6 Louis's final crusade and death, 1267-70 5.3 FRENCH SOCIETY IN THE THIRTEENTH CENTURY 5.3.1 Economic and social developments, 1226-70 5.3.2 Paris in the reign of Louis IX 5.3.3 Religion and learning: the friars, the university and the inquisition 5.4 LOUIS IX AND THE CHURCH 5.4.1 Royal piety, almsgiving and religious patronage 5.4.2 Redemptive kingship: Muslims, heretics, Jews 5.4.3 The king, the French church and the papacy 5.5 THE CONSOLIDATION OF ROYAL POWER 5.5.1 The image of monarchy 5.5.2 Monarchy, kingdom and royal justice 5.5.3 The royal household, administration and finances 5.5.4 Warfare, chivalry and royal defence 5.5.5 The king and the princes 5.5.6 Royal power in Normandy 5.5.7 Royal power in the Languedoc 5.5.8 The king's brothers: Robert of Artois, Alfonso of Poitiers and Charles of Anjou 5.5.9 Louis IX, Henry III of England and the matter of Gascony 5.5.10 Criticisms of the king 5.5.11 The achievements of Louis IX Chapter 6 THE LAST CAPETIANS, 1270-1328: THE APOGEE OF ROYAL POWER 6.1 INTRODUCTION 6.1.1 Royal power under the last Capetians 6.2 THE KINGS AND THEIR REIGNS 6.2.1 Philip III, 1270-85 6.2.2 Philip IV the Fair', 1285-1314 6.2.3 Louis X (1314-16), Philip V (1316-22) and Charles IV (1322-8) 6.3 THE FRENCH ECONOMY AND SOCIETY 6.3.1 Economic and social conditions: the first signs of crisis 6.3.2 The population of France in 1328 6.3.3 Paris, royal capital 6.3.4 Rural life: the Pyrenean village of Montaillou 6.3.5 The king and the social order 6.4 THE NATURE OF ROYAL POWER 6.4.1 The extent of royal power 6.4.2 The canonisation and the cult of Louis IX 6.4.3 Court factions and politics 6.4.4 Royal administration and justice 6.4.5 Royal finances and warfare 6.4.6 The royal domain and the apanages 6.4.7 General and regional assemblies 6.4.8 The crisis of 1314 and the charters of 1315 6.4.9 The king and the principalities 6.5 THE KINGS AND THE CHURCH 6.5.1 The kings and the French church, 1270-1328 6.5.2 Philip IV and Boniface VIII 6.5.3 The suppression of the Templars 6.5.4 The last Capetians and the Crusades 6.5.5 The Avignon papacy CHAPTER 7: EPILOGUE 7.1 THE SUCCESSION AND THE HUNDRED YEARS WAR 7.2 CAPETIAN KINGSHIP: SOME GENERAL PERSPECTIVES 7.3 ART, CULTURE AND RELIGIOUS LIFE IN THE FRENCH KINGDOM Select Bibliography Index
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